What does it say about Florida when the Washington Post names the Mack family its biggest political dynasty?

By on October 10, 2012

Last week, the Washington Post‘s readers were asked to help its writers pick out the biggest state-based political dynasty in all 50 states.

As you can imagine, surnames like Kennedy and Roosevelt and Taft were bantered about.

As for Florida, it got tagged as home of the Macks.

“There was a reason that Rep. Connie Mack IV (R) immediately excelled in the polls when he launched his Senate campaign: name recognition,” blurbs WaPo. “The Mack name is well-known and well-respected in the Sunshine State.”

Mack’s father, Connie Mack III (officially Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy III)  served as a senator and congressman. The younger Mack’s wife is Rep. Mary Bono Mack, and his great-grandfather is baseball Hall-of-Famer Connie Mack.

I really can’t argue with the merits of naming the Mack family is Florida’s most prominent dynasty. It wins by default. The Bush family does not qualify because only Jeb has been elected to office in Florida.

Is there a Hispanic clan in South Florida which has dominated that region that we are not thinking of and deserves consideration? Maybe, but it’s probably the Macks who most resemble a political dynasty in the Sunshine State.

Nothing personal against the Macks, but what does it say that theirs is the most prominent political dynasty in the state?  A baseball manager, a fair-to-middling U.S. Senator, and a Hooters manager hardly qualify as the stuff of political legend, much less dynasty. I mean, no ones going to be writing a hagiography about the touch-football games played on the front yard of the Mack estate, as historians have so done about the Kennedys.

Seriously, Florida, this is the best we can do? The Macks? I wish the writers at the Washington Post would have just skipped over Florida or have written in the Bushes, despite their nouveau status, on the basis of sheer potential.

A state with twenty million people and Connie Mack IV is heir to its throne? Certainly, Florida deserves a better prince.

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